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Article Released Wed-28th-November-2007 21:54 GMT
Contact: Ruth Institution: Nature Publishing Group
 Fungal insecticides: Now come with an extra sting

In Nature China this week - The scorpion toxin makes a fungal insecticide a lot more deadly and Computer simulations reveal how a bat uses its nostrils to emit sounds

Nature China

28 November 2007

Nature China highlights the best research coming out of Mainland China and Hong Kong, providing scientists from around the world with a convenient portal into publications drawn from across all scientific disciplines. Each week, our editors select the best published research and provide a summary of the results. By organizing this research into a comprehensive, regularly updated, one-stop web portal, we hope to help you quickly reach the resources you need to study, and to keep you up-to-date with the most significant research coming out of Mainland China and Hong Kong.

Fungal insecticides: Now come with an extra sting
The scorpion toxin makes a fungal insecticide a lot more deadly

Bipedal nanomotors: Asymmetry locked in
A new, simpler method of fabricating direction-locking and track-walking 'homo-dimer' nanomotors has been proposed

Avian influenza: Bird flu virus sticks in the throat
The H5N1 avian influenza virus can reproduce in cells from the ear, nose and throat, suggesting that some factor other than poor replication in these areas is responsible for the inefficiency of human-to-human and bird-to-human viral transmission

Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs: Abundance and biodiversity
A large-scale survey covering the world's oceans reveals the global distribution and biodiversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

Membranes: A heated conversion
Porous silicon films can be converted in situ into porous, free-standing membranes

Biosonar: Echoes on the nose
Computer simulations reveal how a bat uses its nostrils to emit sounds

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