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Article Released Wed-26th-November-2008 19:25 GMT
Contact: Ruth Institution: Nature Publishing Group
 A fruitless campaign ; The future is Lithium

Fed up of years of arguments about the pros and cons of GM crops, the African Union brought together key individuals and institutions to discuss the issue ; A new generation of lithium-ion batteries, coupled with rising oil prices and the need to address climate change, has sparked a global race to electrify transportation.

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This press release is copyright Nature.

VOL.456 NO.7220 DATED 27 NOVEMBER 2008

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Editorial: A fruitless campaign

A rare collaboration between environmentalists, scientists, policy-makers and multinationals is lauded in an Editorial in Nature this week — but the journal calls on the African Union to formally endorse the resulting report.

Fed up of years of arguments about the pros and cons of GM crops, the African Union brought together key individuals and institutions to discuss the issue. The result, encapsulated in the report, is a fragile consensus on the use of new technologies in agriculture. But the report has yet to be officially released, and Nature calls on the African Union not only to endorse the document but also to use its genesis as a model for ongoing attempts to resolve the food crisis.

This editorial can be read in full here: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n7221/full/456421b.html

Editorial: The future is lithium

A new generation of lithium-ion batteries, coupled with rising oil prices and the need to address climate change, has sparked a global race to electrify transportation. Battery-powered vehicles would not only allow drivers to plug in rather than fill up, but would provide the grid with a distributed, high-capacity storage system for electricity. That system, in turn, would boost wind, solar and other low-carbon energy sources, resulting in a more stable, efficient grid, big reductions in greenhouse-gas emissions and lower home electricity bills.

In a Feature article in this issue, Nature explores the technical and economic challenges involved in realizing this vision. And in an accompanying Editorial, Nature takes US vehicle manufacturers to task for being so slow to recognize these opportunities; and calls on them to use the bail-out money they are seeking from Congress to restructure themselves for the new era.

This editorial can be read in full here:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n7221/full/456421a.html

and the feature is on the press site with the cover and news pages above the top press release

Media contact
Ruth Francis (Head of Press, Nature Publishing Group)
E-mail: r.francis@nature.com

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Keywords associated to this article: GM food, lithium-ion batteries
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