Institutions
Found 203 articles associated to the institution Tohoku University.
 
Simple, mass production of giant vesicles using a porous silicone material
30-October-2018

A technique to generate large amounts of giant vesicle (liposome) dispersion has been developed. The technique involves adsorbing a lipid into a silicone porous material resembling a "marshmallow-like gel" and then squeezing it out like a sponge by impregnating a buffer solution.

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No Assembly Required: Self-assembling Silicone-based Polymers
23-October-2018

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, RIKEN and Tohoku University have developed a silicone polymer chain that can self-assemble into a 3D periodic structure. They achieved this by using their recently reported self-assembling triptycene molecules to modify the ends of the polymer chains.

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In Vivo Skin Imaging Technology Developed
15-October-2018

A Research and Development group led by Professor Yoshifumi Saijo of Tohoku University and Noriyuki Masuda of Advantest has succeeded in developing in vivo skin imaging technology that can simultaneously generate dual-wavelength photoacoustic images and ultrasound images.

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The tightest non-aminoglycoside ligand for the bacterial ribosomal RNA A-site
12-October-2018

A research group at Tohoku University has made a significant discovery with positive implications for the development of bacteria-fighting drugs. The aminoacyl-tRNA site (A-site) of the 16S RNA decoding region in the bacterial ribosome looks promising for a new era of antibiotic drug development.

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Polishing Japanese genome data with distant relatives
12-October-2018

A genome bank for the Japanese population can better identify rare genetic variants and disease susceptibilities by adding samples from distant areas of the country.

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